The God Strategy: How Religion Became a Political Weapon in America
The God Strategy: How Religion Became a Political Weapon in America

 

David Domke and Kevin Coe, The God Strategy: How Religion Became a Political Weapon in America

 
 

David DomkeDavid Domke worked as a journalist in the 1980s and early 1990s, including for the Orange County Register and Atlanta Journal-Constitution, before earning a Ph.D. in Mass Communication from the University of Minnesota in 1996. He is now a Professor and Department Chair in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington.

His research and teaching interests focus on

  • U.S. politics,
  • journalism, and
  • public opinion.

This research agenda has produced more than 30 articles in leading academic journals and a 2004 book that examines the post-9/11 religious rhetoric of the Bush administration and the U.S. press’s response, God Willing?: Political Fundamentalism in the White House, the “War on Terror,” and the Echoing Press (Pluto Press: London and Ann Arbor, MI).

Domke regularly writes essays for a number of news outlets, both off- and online, and speaks about politics, communication, and religion with audiences around the country. He has been interviewed by a wide range of news organizations, including

  • CNN,
  • BBC,
  • Fox News,
  • NBC and MSNBC,
  • NPR,
  • The London Times, and
  • USA Today.

In 2002 Domke received the University of Washington’s Distinguished Teaching Award, the university’s highest honor for teaching. In 2006, he received the Hillier Krieghbaum Under-40 Award, given by the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, for outstanding early career accomplishments. In 2006 he also was named the Washington state Professor of the Year by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

 

Kevin CoeKevin Coe earned a Ph.D. in Communication from the University of Illinois in 2008, and is now an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Arizona.

His research and teaching focus on the interaction of

  • U.S. politics,
  • news media, and
  • public opinion.

This research agenda has produced multiple articles in leading academic journals and three award-winning papers at the annual meetings of the National Communication Association. In addition he has written opinion pieces for a wide range of popular news outlets, including

  • the Chicago Tribune,
  • Baltimore Sun, and
  • Time.com.

During the 2007-2008 academic year Coe served as a Nicholson-IPRH Fellow in the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities, a designation given to only two University of Illinois graduate students.

At Arizona, Coe teaches courses on American politics and mass media.

For every semester he taught while at Illinois, student evaluations of his teaching earned him a spot on the Universitys List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent.

In 2007 Coe received the Ruth S. and Charles H. Bowman Award recognizing the most outstanding graduate student in the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois, and in 2009 his doctoral dissertation received the Gerald R. Miller Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award from the National Communication Association.

 
 
© 2007-2010 David Domke and Kevin Coe
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